Building for art. Building for life.

The intersection between life, art and functionality has never been more apparent than in the architecture of rising buildings in Asia. As metropolitan cities continue to experience a growing population in people seeking employment and education, now more than ever, city planners, proprietors, land developers, and other involved parties are finding an increasing variety of factors, like space, transport and access, to consider in the construction of living and working spaces. Despite the obvious challenge in achieving such a feat, they are finding solutions. And they’re doing it with style.

The newly proposed design for the Fangda Business Headquarters in Shenzhen, China is an inspiring example. The complex features four towers that seemingly melt and swirl into each other towards the ground. ArchDaily, a website that showcases not only awesome, but smart architecture, compares this feature of the complex to an “eye of a cyclone.” The complex is, by all means, impressive and imposing, communicating its purpose for serious business with its glass and aluminum encasing.

52796d58e8e44e865400003a_fangda-business-headquarters-huasen-architects-_06_ren

52796d0be8e44e8654000036_fangda-business-headquarters-huasen-architects-_02_ren-530x662

Aesthetic appeal aside, the new Fangda Business Headquarters further excels in other areas as it strives to cater to the lifestyle of the people who’ll walk its halls and fill its elevators. Its bottom floors boasts commercial space for retail shops and eateries. And, perhaps most importantly, it features a bus terminal, a requisite of the design as outlined by Fangda, to accommodate the federally estimated 55% of human traffic arriving to the complex by bus.

The Fangda Business Headquarters is undoubtedly designed for not only its function, but also its artistic appeal. Its concept is so uniquely tied to the life of the people, the city, and the country that it stands to become an awe-inspiring landmark. To see more striking architecture around the world with similar qualities, visit ArchDaily.

Leave a Reply