Nov
16

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Building for art. Building for life.

The intersection between life, art and functionality has never been more apparent than in the architecture of rising buildings in Asia. As metropolitan cities continue to experience a growing population in people seeking employment and education, now more than ever, city planners, proprietors, land developers, and other involved parties are finding an increasing variety of factors, like space, transport and access, to consider in the construction of living and working spaces. Despite the obvious challenge in achieving such a feat, they are finding solutions. And they’re doing it with style.

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Nov
10

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吉岡 徳仁 Crystallize

Tokujin Yoshioka continues to challenge the frameworks of art-making with his unrelenting experimentation with organic media. A renowned Japanese artist, architect, and designer, Yoshioka’s retrospective exhibition titled “Crystallize”, at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo, has transformed the raw, steel encased space into an ethereal garden of light and movement. Works include “Swan Lake”, a “painting” constructed from crystal growth reacting to six months of tonal vibrations from Tchaikovsky’s ballet. Another piece titled “Rose”, a sculpture encased in crystal, sits amidst Yoshioka’s “Tornado”, an embracing and almost overwhelming installation created from millions of transparent straws, which reflect the arbitrary formation of crystal on the flower sculpture.

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Nov
10

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“Under the Influence”

Last week, I was fortunate enough to meet up with RISD Graduate students Janet Shih and Chihao Yo, curators of the “Under the Influence” exhibit at the RISD Museum. Found in Gellman Gallery, this display is full of eye-catching art expressed through a wide array of media, from canvas to video, a baby’s rocking chair to communion wafers, a disembodied arm to a motion-detecting wooden chair. The curators and I had a pleasant chat about art, inspiration, and what it’s like to curate a “show full of favorites.”

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Nov
2

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From the Archives: Mila Chadayammuri and Elliot Creagor’s cover of “Easy”

The recent release of Traces of You, Anoushka Shankar’s collaboration with her half-sister Norah Jones, brings back memories of one of the most beautiful performances at the VISIONS Release Party from Fall 2011. Here is a video from Mila Chadayammuri ’13 and Elliot Creagor ’13, covering Shankar’s Easy.

Videos of the past eight Release Parties can be found on our Youtube Channel here. Our next Release Party, to celebrate the release of Fall 2013, will be held on December 4 (Wednesday), at 8 pm in Salomon 001. Don’t forget to mark your calendars!

Nov
30

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Review: Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry

Ai Wei Wei Never Sorry

He [Ai Wei Wei] is really brilliant, he can take his own response and very naturally turn it into art. Who else in contemporary art does this?” said Artist Chan Danqing.

The idea of Alison Klayman’s documentary Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry is very clear: it is about Ai Weiwei, his life, his art and his social activism.

Ai Weiwei was one of the first generation artists who studied abroad in the United States. Having lived in the United States for thirteen years before returning to Beijing, his views about politics are more liberal than many other people in China and he acts in a more radical way. However, compared to his fellow artists, he is an exception. While some artists care less about Chinese politics, Ai Wei Wei pours his mind and time into making himself heard in China through making strong political statement through art.

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